Root Canal Therapy

When tooth decay penetrates the tooth’s enamel and enters the pulp, or inner tissue, infection and pain can occur. Often times, if the infected pulp is not removed from the tooth, the tooth will be lost. Because of this, root canal therapy aims to preserve the tooth by removing the infected pulp, which effectively relieves pain and rids the tooth of infection.

Why a Root Canal?


  • With modern anesthesia options and dental techniques, root canals are similar in sensation to having a filling. In fact, the tooth pain you likely feel before a root canal is more painful than the procedure itself, and the procedure will relieve this pain.

  • Root canals are the only way to remove the infected tissue and restore the tooth, otherwise it will need to be extracted.

  • If an infected tooth remains untreated, the infection will likely spread to the surrounding teeth and gums, causing more pain. This can eventually lead to the loss of multiple teeth and deterioration of the jawbone.

Let's dive in to see how Root Canal work...



Did You Know?

One of the most common dental myths is that root canals are painful. As a matter of fact, 15% of Americans avoid obtaining dental care due to fear of this common misconception. Contrary to popular belief, however, root canals are actually virtually painless and 89% of patients are satisfied with their results after root canal treatment.

Do I need a Root Canal?

In some cases, infections may not show symptoms and will only be identified during your bi-annual checkup. In other cases, the following symptoms may indicate you need a root canal:

  • Toothache
  • Sudden sensitivity to heat and cold
  • Swelling in your gums, face, or lymph nodes
  • Sudden bad taste in your mouth

The Root Canal Process

The first step in the root canal process is to ensure your comfort during the procedure. Before the procedure begins, you will be properly anesthetized to prevent you from feeling any discomfort. Then, a small hole will be drilled in your tooth to access the pulp and remove all the infected tissue from the pulp chamber and root canals. The inside of your tooth will then be disinfected thoroughly, and a rubber-like substance will be used to fill the now empty pulp chamber and root canals. At this point, your tooth will then be sealed and a crown will be placed to restore the outer layer of the tooth.

Think you might need a root canal? Don’t wait until you are in excruciating pain, Schedule a consultation with Dr. Reza Abaei Tafreshi of Aliso Viejo Family Dental Group today!